You get to go find a new dream

Sep 19

edgewired ha respondido a tu publicación:How can now at days everyone manage to take…
Well I’m sure part of it is just practice and knowing which angle you look best in and I’m sure a good part of it is just having a good camera. But I’m sure after a while it’s gets easier to take nice pictures. Practice makes perfect ;D

Aww you are right! I think I will have to practice more because I feel awkward posing for photos (I never know how to smile or pose of what to do with my hands), and I don’t think my photos (of places and stuff) are that good so I think I just need to practice, practice and practice ;u;!!

suicunesrider:

when u get online before ur friend and there’s big news in ur fandom

image

(vía spookmallow)

How can now at days everyone manage to take incredible photos? I see on social media so many great photos of places with great angles and everything, also how everyone manage to look so good when they take pictures of themselves? Is there something I didn’t learn growing up or? 

stfuconservatives:

How To Talk to People Who Are In Wheelchairs

wheelchairproblems:

One of the things I notice when I am in my #wheelchair  is that many adults have difficulty knowing exactly what to say or how to act with someone who is in a wheelchair. Sometimes I notice inadvertent, side-glances; people who don’t glance directly at me, but will furtively look at me and then look away, as though they’re afraid of being caught staring.

I think that it is important to note that while you may be curious, some good general tips are as follows.  

Tip 1. If you are curious and want to look at my wheelchair, please openly look at me, as you would look at any other able-bodied adult, and make eye contact. This is much less hurtful to me than when people pretend to be looking at something else while sneaking side-glances at me and my wheelchair.

I think I know why they do this; it is an ingrained cultural concept that we should not stare at others who are different. However, doing that kind of thing makes me feel like I am some kind of bizarre person, and increases my feeling of isolation.

People often have a natural desire to look at a wheelchair. It’s ok. A wheelchair is something out of the ordinary. However, it is immensely more painful to me if you give me a couple of sidelong glances and then move on without ever saying hello or acknowledging me. You don’t have to talk to me, but please do nod or smile as you would do to a normal person. It restores my feeling of humanity and equality.

Tip 2. If you have questions, ask, in a polite and respectful manner. I am usually very happy to answer questions about my condition or why I am in a wheelchair. I know I make people curious, especially because I am young. Many people don’t understand my disease, lupus, and want to know why I am in a wheelchair, especially when I don’t have a visible cast or broken bone. Politely asking is not offensive; ignoring and staring covertly is.

Tip 3. If you have small children, and they ask you something like, “Mamma, why is that girl in a wheelchair?” The best way to respond is probably to say something like “I don’t know; let’s ask her.” I have heard parents hush children up with a “Stop it, that question isn’t appropriate,” or they may say, “We don’t ask people those sorts of things. It’s rude.” Children have a natural curiosity about the way the world functions. They want to know. And by allowing them to approach and talk to me, you are increasing their tolerance and acceptance for people with disabilities. Plus, the majority of people in wheelchairs are happy to interact with curious children. They ask the questions that the majority of adults are thinking, but are afraid to ask.

Tip 4. When talking to me, don’t feel you need to kneel down or get on my level to talk with me face to face. While I understand that some people do that, thinking that it allows them to better make eye contact with me, but on the whole, it comes across as condescending. I know I’m in a wheelchair and I know that you’re going to be looking down at me. Although I am 5’11” when I stand up, in the wheelchair, I’m very short. And that’s ok. Just talk to me as you’d talk to me if I stood up and was facing you. We’re still on the same conversational level even if you tower above me. At the same time, don’t hug a wheelchair user if you’re just meeting them for the same time, unless you would hug a casual acquaintance in the same situation; make sure to treat those in a wheelchair with the same respect for physical distance you’d treat those who were able bodied. 

Tip 5. Offering help to a wheelchair user in obvious distress is ok.  For example, yesterday my motorized wheelchair went slightly off the road and got stuck in a patch of mud; I couldn’t get it out of the mud without someone’s help. Sometimes people walk on by, and look sympathetic, but aren’t sure what to say for fear of offense. A kind, “can I help you?” or “Can I be of any assistance?” can sometimes be greatly appreciated. At the same time, if the wheelchair user says ‘no, I’m fine,” it’s best to respect his/her preference. 

Tip 6. Not everyone in a wheelchair is paralyzed. But people usually assume that is why you would use one. Illness and frailty often make wheelchair use necessary, and it can be just as necessary as for those who cannot move their limbs at all. The reason I use a wheelchair is because of a neurocardiogenic syncopy issue, which is a miscommunication between my brain and my heart. I pass out when I stand for periods of time which can be as short as 30 seconds long. I know this is difficult to understand, but think of it in terms of computers: I blue-screen if I stand too long. 

Tip 7. Dogs sometimes freak out when they see people in wheelchairs. Even normally well behaved dogs. This is due to the fact that dogs’ minds don’t work like our own; they don’t see a person sitting in a chair with wheels; they see a strange creature, half human, half wheelchair hybrid. So be prepared that your normally calm dog who’s not used to seeing wheelchairs may turn suddenly upset when they see a person using one. Steady, calm your dog, and rein them in. It’s not a training failure on your part; it’s natural dog behavior and a part of how they perceive the world. If your dog will regularly come into contact with people who are in wheelchairs (for example, a neighbor or relative) it would be wise to train them to get used to a wheelchair. They see the world differently than we do. My dog, Sirius, is fully trained to adjust to the wheelchair. I’ve attached a picture of him and me interacting while I use my motorized wheelchair. 

If you have further questions about this, feel free to leave them in the comments- or reshare. I’m sure other folk who live and work in wheelchairs may have other feedback to add. The point I’m trying to express is etiquette; and these are the thoughts that often go through my mind when navigating stores, museums, or when I’m out in public. 

BTW, I am not, and cannot be a spokesperson for all wheelchair users. We are all unique and we all have our own preferences, as do all individuals. These are some generalities, and some are specific to me, but some other people who use wheelchairs or who are disabled may feel differently. This is why it is important to ask each person how they feel and what they would prefer. 

The reason I speak up with these tips is because I suspect a majority of them are across the board true for many disabled populations; we often get ignored rather than asked what we would like, because people are many times afraid to speak to us openly. Don’t be afraid of offense. Discussing disability increases understanding and tolerance.

I love this.

(Fuente: dailydares, vía anesthetiquette)

seselapod:

wasserplane:

radiovistoron:

agehagyaru:

magicalpoptarts:

vaaseline:

wonder-mechanic:

radiovistoron:

Chrome, please stop this.

ITS ACTUALLY THE WORST PLEASE MAKE IT STOP

ok i was confused i thought it was just my shit or soemthing becus i seen nothing about this shit

oh so it’s not just me. ok

i’m using firefox and i’m getting that too.
it’s not just chrome.

Yeah, it’s not happened to me on Firefox myself, but only Chrome hence why I blamed Chrome. :’)

ACTUALLY it’s tumblr! it’s a new, stupid option. here’s how to turn it off


this post saved my life

seselapod:

wasserplane:

radiovistoron:

agehagyaru:

magicalpoptarts:

vaaseline:

wonder-mechanic:

radiovistoron:

Chrome, please stop this.

ITS ACTUALLY THE WORST PLEASE MAKE IT STOP

ok i was confused i thought it was just my shit or soemthing becus i seen nothing about this shit

oh so it’s not just me. ok

i’m using firefox and i’m getting that too.

it’s not just chrome.

Yeah, it’s not happened to me on Firefox myself, but only Chrome hence why I blamed Chrome. :’)

ACTUALLY it’s tumblr! it’s a new, stupid option. here’s how to turn it off

image

this post saved my life

(vía edgewired)

dynastylnoire:

rebelbaes:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

POLICE BRUTALITY/TERRORISM STRIKES AGAIN: Witnesses Say A Utah African-American Man Was Running Away From Police When They Shot & Murdered Him [TW: Racism, Ethnocentrism, White Privilege]
An attorney for the family of the 22-year-old black man who was fatally shot by Utah police last week says the evidence suggests he was running away—contradicting earlier reports that he had “lunged” at the police officers.
Darrien Hunt attracted police attention Wednesday morning outside Saratoga Springs when he allegedly began walking around with a samurai sword. His family later described the sword as a “harmless 3-foot souvenir sword with a rounded edge” purchased at a gift shop, the AP reports.
Hunt was reportedly shot at least four times and died on the street outside a Panda Expressrestaurant.
Police initially claimed they shot him after he “brandished the sword and lunged toward the officers with the sword,” Utah County Chief Deputy Attorney Tim Taylor told reporters.
But Hunt’s mother—and some witnesses—say otherwise.
"They killed my son because he’s black. No white boy with a little sword would they shoot while he’s running away," Susan Hunt told the Deseret Times. “Those stupid cops thought they had to murder over a toy. This is my baby. This is my family. And they ruined my family.”
According to the LA Times, there’s evidence that suggests the shooting may not have been warranted:

According to Salt Lake City attorney Randall K. Edwards, an independent autopsy conducted Saturday at the behest of Hunt’s family showed Hunt had been shot “numerous times,” none from the front. 
"This is consistent with statements made by witnesses on the scene, who report that Darrien was shot to death while running away from the police," Edwards said in a statement provided to the Los Angeles Times on Sunday. "It would appear difficult, if not impossible, to reconcile these facts with the story released by the Utah County Attorney’s Office that Darrien was lunging toward the officers when he was shot. We continue to hope that a full investigation will reveal the whole truth about this tragedy."

The LA Times does note, however, that Edwards declined to identify the pathologist or provide reporters with a copy of the report.
[image via ABC 4 Utah]
Source: Gabrielle Bluestone for Gawker

You know shit cray when a white mom’s black son can’t even make it to 30. 

they don’t care if your mom is white when you look black

dynastylnoire:

rebelbaes:

thepoliticalfreakshow:

POLICE BRUTALITY/TERRORISM STRIKES AGAIN: Witnesses Say A Utah African-American Man Was Running Away From Police When They Shot & Murdered Him [TW: Racism, Ethnocentrism, White Privilege]

An attorney for the family of the 22-year-old black man who was fatally shot by Utah police last week says the evidence suggests he was running away—contradicting earlier reports that he had “lunged” at the police officers.

Darrien Hunt attracted police attention Wednesday morning outside Saratoga Springs when he allegedly began walking around with a samurai sword. His family later described the sword as a “harmless 3-foot souvenir sword with a rounded edge” purchased at a gift shop, the AP reports.

Hunt was reportedly shot at least four times and died on the street outside a Panda Expressrestaurant.

Police initially claimed they shot him after he “brandished the sword and lunged toward the officers with the sword,” Utah County Chief Deputy Attorney Tim Taylor told reporters.

But Hunt’s mother—and some witnesses—say otherwise.

"They killed my son because he’s black. No white boy with a little sword would they shoot while he’s running away," Susan Hunt told the Deseret Times. “Those stupid cops thought they had to murder over a toy. This is my baby. This is my family. And they ruined my family.”

According to the LA Times, there’s evidence that suggests the shooting may not have been warranted:

According to Salt Lake City attorney Randall K. Edwards, an independent autopsy conducted Saturday at the behest of Hunt’s family showed Hunt had been shot “numerous times,” none from the front. 

"This is consistent with statements made by witnesses on the scene, who report that Darrien was shot to death while running away from the police," Edwards said in a statement provided to the Los Angeles Times on Sunday. "It would appear difficult, if not impossible, to reconcile these facts with the story released by the Utah County Attorney’s Office that Darrien was lunging toward the officers when he was shot. We continue to hope that a full investigation will reveal the whole truth about this tragedy."

The LA Times does note, however, that Edwards declined to identify the pathologist or provide reporters with a copy of the report.

[image via ABC 4 Utah]

Source: Gabrielle Bluestone for Gawker

You know shit cray when a white mom’s black son can’t even make it to 30. 

they don’t care if your mom is white when you look black

(vía anesthetiquette)

Sep 18

freeglassart ha dicho: You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

typette:

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

image

start to put on features

image

fix stuff

image

put on more stuff

image

fix stuff again

image

erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

image

2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

image

image

image

That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

it’s nice to see how others do stuff like this, everyone is different but there’s something to learn from everybody!

jointhebandom:

alright you guys can stop posting about it now because this girl just fucking summed up everything in existence

jointhebandom:

alright you guys can stop posting about it now because this girl just fucking summed up everything in existence

(vía spookmallow)

color-palettes:

Overripe Nectarines - Submitted by electricbluetempest
#E0470D #E36419 #F1973F #F5A86A #FE9D12 #FE7A0B

color-palettes:

Overripe Nectarines - Submitted by electricbluetempest

#E0470D #E36419 #F1973F #F5A86A #FE9D12 #FE7A0B